Strategic initiatives

  • Emily King leads a group with Toutouwai/North Island robin being carried into the release site on Mt Taranaki. Image - Mark Dwyer

    Emily King leads a group with Toutouwai/North Island robin being carried into the release site on Mt Taranaki. Image - Mark Dwyer

  • Monitoring pest abundance and native biodiversity using camera trap technology in the Cape to City project. Image - Lauren Buchholz

    Monitoring pest abundance and native biodiversity using camera trap technology in the Cape to City project. Image - Lauren Buchholz

Flagship sites

To enhance community engagement and raise the profi le of science with the public, the BioHeritage Challenge supports several flagship sites. Flagship sites showcase to the public the research done by our Challenge parties. Flagship site partnerships provide a pathway to achieve a fundamental shift in the way we conduct science and research activities in New Zealand. In particular, we believe that transformational environmental change can only be achieved through partnerships with Māori, community industry and the private sector.

Flagship site: Cape to City

Cape to City is a large-scale ecological restoration project located in Hawke’s Bay. The project is on a mission to transform pest management so that native species can thrive where people live, work and play. Since 2011, Cape to City and sister project Poutiri Ao ō Tāne have been providing significant benefits to Hawke’s Bay. Local teachers are learning how to use the landscape as an extended classroom, and groundbreaking predator control systems for a primary production landscape are paving the way for farmers and other landowners to efficiently manage pests. Native species historically lost to the area are being returned, and innovative research is providing a foundation for the future.

Contributing partners: local hapū, DOC, Hawke’s Bay Regional Council, Manaaki Whenua, Cape Sanctuary,and the Aotearoa Foundation.

Flagship site: Taranaki Mounga

Taranaki Mounga is a landscape-scale ecological restoration project over an area that includes the 34,000 hectares of national park encompassing Taranaki, Pouākai, Kaitake and the protected Ngā Motu/Sugar Loaf Islands. It aims to help restore ecological links between the mounga and the moana (‘mountain and sea’), connecting the park to the coast via river corridors down at least three rivers of importance to Taranaki iwi and communities.

Through building community support and commitment, Taranaki Mounga aims to ensure that the transformational changes it achieves are valued and secured long into the future. The project aims to inspire young people to be the next generation of kaitiaki (guardians) of the mounga and national park.

The mounga’s objectives align with the Government’s vision of a predator-free New Zealand by 2050.

This research is a collaboration between the Department of Conservation, eight Taranaki iwi, and the NEXT Foundation, supported by sponsors Shell NZ, Jasmine Social Investments, TSB Community Trust and Manaaki Whenua.

Related content

Setting a trap. Image - Natalie de Burgh
Flagship sites

Strategic initiatives

We believe that partnering with Flagship sites will help New Zealand achieve transformational environmental change and assist the…