Sustaining and restoring ecosystems

  • Ocean Beach hinterland. Image - Richard Brimmer

    Ocean Beach hinterland. Image - Richard Brimmer

  • Kereru at Zealandia. Credit - Brendan Doran

    Kereru at Zealandia. Credit - Brendan Doran

  • Frozen vegetation by creek. Image - Ronny Groenteman

    Frozen vegetation by creek. Image - Ronny Groenteman

  • Soil Sampling, Pukaki. Image - Malcolm McLeod

    Soil Sampling, Pukaki. Image - Malcolm McLeod

Leader: Dr Duane Peltzer, Manaaki Whenua

The health of our biological heritage depends on sustaining our natural capital (our stocks of natural assets, including geology, soil, air, water and all living things) in an ever-changing biotic, economic and social environment.

Recent international advances have shown the benefit of quantitative analysis of our ecosystems and their derived services. This Challenge will provide the underpinning research to make this a reality in New Zealand.

Our goal is to improve the resilience of vulnerable ecosystems and enhance our natural capital. We want to prevent irreversible biodiversity loss and damaging biotic invasions, which are being exacerbated by issues such as land-use intensification and climate change.

Helping primary production and native biodiversity work together

The humble tea bag is significant for researchers studying native biodiversity in agricultural landscapes.…

Managing threats to freshwater taonga invertebrates

Managing non-native fish may be the answer to safeguarding freshwater taonga (treasured) species.…

Taking a biocultural approach to restoring New Zealand’s biodiversity

How kaitiakitanga (Māori guardianship) approaches could contribute to reversing environmental decline.…

Recovering degraded streams and rivers

Researchers are using freshwater systems to test resistance in degraded ecosystems.…

Predicting and preventing ecosystem decline

A framework to help predict and prevent harmful and difficult-to-reverse changes in ecosystems.…