Tohu o te wā – Hangarau pūtaiao

  • Te Ana Ureure cave

    Te Ana Ureure cave

  • Hīnaki, Mangaokewa Reserve

    Hīnaki, Mangaokewa Reserve

  • Youth from Te Wharekura o Maniapoto in Oparure, headed by their kaiako Hōhepa Hei, are learning how to keep an eye on their local rivers and tuna.

    Youth from Te Wharekura o Maniapoto in Oparure, headed by their kaiako Hōhepa Hei, are learning how to keep an eye on their local rivers and tuna.

Signs of our time – fusing technology and science to connect people to place

This project aims to develop a mātauranga (Māori knowledge) tool that will take a cross-domain perspective on the health of the environment from whenua to moana (land to sea).

The aim of the pilot is to develop a Te Ao Māori framework with Te Whare Kura o Maniapoto (Te Kuiti) and Te Whare Kura O Rakaumaunga (Huntly) which will measure the state of the māuri (life force) in the habitats. Ultimately, this framework will be transferred into a mobile application to support students throughout the region to engage in kaitiakitanga (guardianship).

BioHeritage Challenge co-funding is supporting three wānanga (educational forums) to develop the framework, plus planning for a regional showcase of the mobile app with the tauira (students) who designed it.

This project is an extension of the Unlocking Curious Minds project Tūhonohono from 2017, connecting people to place.

Tohu o te wā – Hangarau pūtaiao is lead by Kiri Reihana & Yvonne Taura. The project is a collaboration between Te Whare Kura O Maniapoto, Te Whare kura Rakaumanga, and Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research. It is supported by the Unlocking Curious Minds contestable fund and the BioHeritage Challenge.